Rollin’ In It

Time just gets away from me. We had a busy summer, full of garden, growing fruit, a little travel, a little family time – lots of things. Here is a little of the fiber fun I had since we got back from Oaxaca last February. 

Fiber Prep

I acquired just one fleece this summer – a full Jacob fleece from a ewe named Polly, owned by my cousin Robin. She’s the same cousin that I bought a fleece from last year, and whom I made a cap for to show my appreciation. Polly’s fleece is wonderful: the white part is downy with minimal guard hair, while the brown part is rustic. Both will spin up to some great yarns. I’m pondering a Winemaker’s Waistcoat for this fiber.

The Clown Barf is a quick space dye job that I did on some leftover Merino/Silk blend top that I’d purchased for B’s Reversible Cable Scarf.  It spins up pretty nicely on a supported spindle: 

Concrete plans for this light-as-air DK yarn haven’t been made yet, but I suspect it may end up as caps for grand-daughters, perhaps paired with some dark yarn for contrast. 

Knitting

Lots of projects on the needles in the past six months. 

The Roberta Socks are based on Hermione’s Everyday Socks, and are knitted in a bamboo & wool blend that breathes amazingly well and is cool on the toes. Selfish knitting: these are for me! 

The V-neck vest is in progress, and is very loosely adapted from Tami Parks’ Diamonds For Him – a pattern I used for B’s Mocha Vest last spring. 

Something a bit different for me this autumn: I got bit by the Fair Isle bug after watching a video on the Two-Handed Fair Isle technique. I combined remnants from my combo-spin cardigan and some brown 2-ply Shetland that I’d spun and adapted Paula Berman’s Semi-Swedish Hat for DK weight yarn. What fun! This pattern is going to be knitted again – perhaps many times!

And, lastly, spinning cotton generally results in having cotton yarn to knit with. I knitted myself a little treat for my gym bag – probably the softest, most absorbent washcloth I’ve ever used. Nice! I’m looking forward to working with more cotton yarns.

Spinning

And, yet there’s Cotton . . . .

We grew cotton this year. Six plants each of green and brown cotton, in big black plastic pots against a sunny, warm wall of our house. Just an experiment, but such fun! I’ve got a little stash now of each color of cotton and will be spinning it after the first of the coming year. 

Cotton spinning is a new thing for me, and I’ve taken right to it. Heretofore, I’ve spun it on a coin tahkli spindle, but I just recently bought a fast flyer for my Sonata wheel, so let the cotton spinning commence. . . . I want to spin enough to WEAVE!! 

Acquisitions

Yup, I’ve been bitten by the bug. OLAD strikes again! (Obsessive Loom Acquisition Disorder) Now, we just need to finish that studio! 

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6 thoughts on “Rollin’ In It

  1. Gads girl!! You have been busy. Makes me want to stop with the quilting for a bit and enjoy some spinning myself. How I love to hear the whir of the wheel and feel the fiber sift through my fingers. {:>
    Your cotton turned out lovely. How fun! Who would think you could grown cotton in your rain forest?! I can’t wait to see that waistcoat! You do such lovely work. But I expect once you get to weaving you will be more than in love with that. Then it will be the whoosh, thump, thump for you. {:> See you in the spring if we make it through the matress.

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    1. I’m looking forward to weaving – perhaps next summer. Not quite sure when we’ll get the studio done, but I may have to weave in an unfinished studio while the weather’s warm. 🙂

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    1. You knit beautifully, Olivia! My spinning & dyeing is motivated by the idea that the yarns I want to create with are far more expensive in the market than I can afford – but by starting ‘from scratch’, as it were, I can afford to work with extraordinary fibers and yarns at a fraction of the commercial price. That, and hand-processed fiber has a life and vibrancy to it that you can’t get in ‘store-bought’ yarms – even from indie dyers. Mill-spun wool feels ‘dead’ to me, while hand processed handspun is very lively and full of spirit. THAT is why I spin & dye.

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